Where on (Google) Earth #118?

Dr. Lemming did a masterful job of selecting a stumper for WoGE #117. I spent days navigating the Indo-Gangetic Plain in search of his dastardly delta – I was about ready to qualify for my riverboat pilot’s license. Alas, it wasn’t until he delivered the camel-clue that I was released from the Camel Clutch that the Ganga held me with.

Despite really wanting to get back to the mountains, I came across so many interesting deltas that I figured I’d share one of them for WoGE #118. As always, the winner is the person who first posts the location of the feature(s) in question (latitude and longitude will suffice), but a professional grade (prograde) answer will also explain its geologic significance…

Basic Australian overhead (map) view…

Where on (Google) Earth #118

We don’t need no stinkin’ Schott Rule!

Kilauea Summit Activity

For the first time since 1924 there has been an explosive eruption at the summit caldera of Kilauea Volcano. In fact, until last week there had been no significant events at Kilauea’s summit since the short lived September 1982 fissure eruption. For the last 25+ years most of Kilauea’s activity has been focused at Pu’u O’o and related vents along the East Rift Zone.

When I visited in January of 2004 we were told by USGS volcanologists that the summit magma chamber was thought to be as shallow as one kilometer below Halema’uma’u Crater (itself approximately one kilometer in diameter). For the last few months sulfur dioxide gas emissions at the summit have been elevated and the Park Service has closed the Crater Rim Road in the area near Halema’uma’u as a precaution. Just last week one of the gas vents along the walls of Halema’uma’u dramatically increased its activity and since the weekend there has even been incandescence from this vent. Then last night just before 3:00am HST there was an explosive eruption (originally interpreted as a M3.7 earthquake) at this vent which showered the area around the viewing deck with blocks of old lava (no juvenile material) up to a cubic meter in volume and left a new 30m wide explosion crater.

The two panoramas below were shot at the rim of Halema’uma’u during my January 2004 visit – the top one from the visitor’s overlook (just above the new vent) and the bottom one from just north of the 1982 vents.

Visitors Overlook

Click on the image for a larger version – or view a QTVR panorama of this image.

1982 Vents Overlook

Click on the image for a larger version – or view a QTVR panorama of this image.

You can monitor the current activity at Halema’uma’u from with the live summit webcam located at the Hawaii Volcano Observatory at the Jaggar Museum. Daily updates (more frequent as necessary) from the HVO are also available.

St. Patty's Day Deskcrop GeoPuzzle

For Spring Break I get to clean up the rock storage room (yay!). So let’s see how many of the following green deskcrops you can identify! Main credit for identifying the green rock/mineral(s) – extra credit for the localities. (Click on each image for a larger view.)

[UPDATE: Final answers are posted!]

Deskcrop #1
Deskcrop #1 – Olivine-rich sand
From near Ka Lae, Hawaii
Sample ID and Locality Winner: Callan Bentley
Deskcrop #2
Deskcrop #2 – Epidote-rich Blueschist
from the Rand Schist, near Randsburg, California
Green Mineral ID Winner: Callan Bentley
Deskcrop #3
Deskcrop #3 – Eclogite
Adula Nappe, Italian Alps
Rock ID Winner: Callan Bentley
Mineral ID Winner: Silver Fox
Deskcrop #4
Deskcrop #4 – Dunite
Val Sesia, Ivrea Zone, Italian Alps
Rock ID Winner: Chris (GoodSchist)
Mineral ID Winner: GeologyJoe
Locality ID Winner: Kim Hannula
Deskcrop #5
Deskcrop #5 – Charnockite (OPX-bearing granite)
near Canada Lake, Adirondack Mts., New York
Deskcrop #6
Deskcrop #6 – Slate
Metawee Formation, Taconic Slate Belt, Vermont
Rock ID Winner: Chris (GoodSchist)
Mineral ID Winner: GeologyJoe
Locality ID Winner: Kim Hannula
Deskcrop #7
Deskcrop #7 – Green Quartzite – fuchsite (Cr-mica)
near Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada
Rock ID Winner: Callan Bentley
Mineral ID Winner: Silver Fox
Deskcrop #8
Deskcrop #8 – Epidote
from a skarn in the Old Woman Mts., California
Mineral ID Winner: Silver Fox
Deskcrop #9
Deskcrop #9 – Wollastonite-Garnet-Diopside Skarn
Willsboro, NY
Rock & Mineral ID Winner: Kim Hannula
Locality ID Winner: Kim Hannula
Deskcrop #10
Deskcrop #10 – Amphibolite
Green Mineral ID: Chromian Pargasite
Seiad Ophiolite, Klamath Mountains, California

May the luck of the Irish be with you!

World's First Anaglyph GigaPan!

Get out those red/blue glasses and prepare to be amazed by the world’s first 3D Gigapan image. You can see the effect best when zooming in on the telephone poles, the road, and the crests of the grassy hills in the middle ground.


Distant Cliffs of Fort Hays Limestone, Saline River Valley, Ellis County, Kansas
Launch Full Screen Viewer | View in Google Earth 4.2

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Housekeeping

Regular visitors may notice that my header has changed (it’s now a rotating image – go ahead reload the page to see another one). This is something I’ve been contemplating for quite a while. Actually, I had previously considered splitting my geology blogging off to The Outcrop (to reflect my domain name ‘outcrop.org’), as I have since moved my local blogging to Fortress Hays. But since the geoblogosphere has taken off over the past year I’ve been more and more reticent to give up the blog juice I’ve accumulated here.

I also realize that this blog has an awkwardly long title. Almost from the beginning I’ve called my personal web page “The Geology Home Companion”. When I got the blog started back in March of 2006 (yes, I’m officially coming up on my third blogiversary) I was thinking about SEO and I wanted to include my name and the term “geology” in the title, so the monstrosity that emerged is what you see above. I know it’s a bear to fit into sidebar blogrolls (it’s listed in my own as “GHC Blog”), but again, I’m wary of changing it for fear of losing whatever “branding” karma has accrued over the years. I’m hesitant to switch it to simply “The Outcrop” since this is the title of UW-Madison’s Geology & Geophysics Departmental Alumni publication and they clearly would have naming priority if the issue of intellectual property rights were ever raised (I haven’t heard any complaints from Garrison Keillor or American Public Radio on the current title).

Anyhow, I hope you enjoy the new header. Feel free to make a game of identifying all of the localities/geologic features.

Where on (Google) Earth #116?

Péter Luffi and I have got quite a volley going with recent Where on (Google) Earth entries. The back and forth is great (for us), but I’d love to see someone else jump out of the stands and steal the ball. I’ve posted a bunch of rivers recently, so to change it up a bit I’m going for something a bit dryer. The features in question were in the news a year or two ago when an interesting origin was proposed for them. So as usual, the winner is the person who first posts the location of the feature(s) in question (latitude and longitude will suffice), but you’ll make a much bigger splash if you can also identify the hypothesized geologic origin of the feature in question…

Basic overhead (map) view…

Where on (Google) Earth #116

At the risk of continuing our back and forth volley, I’m NOT invoking the Schott Rule (yet again). Good luck!

Washburn Point QTVR

With all of the Gigapanning I’ve been doing lately it’s been far too long since I posted a cubic QTVR image. So with no further ado, I give you Washburn Point, Yosemite National Park…



The High Sierra from Washburn Point, Yosemite National Park, June 24, 2005

Enjoy!